Category: EDUCAUSE

RIT InfoSec Awareness: an Interview With Ben Woelk

RIT Information Security Card Deck

RIT InfoSec Awareness an Interview With Ben Woelk.

Read my interview with RIT alumnus Neil DuPaul on the Veracode Blog where we discuss how we’re increasing information security awareness at the Rochester Institute of Technology. What do you think of the cards?

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Engage! Creating a Meaningful Security Awareness Program (Updated)

7/12/12 Updated with seminar slides!
View more PowerPoint from Ben Woelk

This may start quite the discussion, but it’s a viable argument that good Information Security practices are primarily about people, not technology.

Do you need help creating a security awareness program? Would you like to use social media to engage your audience?Would you like to integrate video or podcasts? Do you know how to best participate in National Cyber Security Awareness Month or Data Privacy Day?

Cherry Delaney (Purdue University) and Ben Woelk (Rochester Institute of Technology) presented a 3½ hour seminar at the EDUCAUSE Security Professionals/IT Enterprise Leadership Conference in Indianapolis on Thursday afternoon, May 17th.

The seminar is designed for security managers, CIOs, CISOs, ISO, and IT Communications professionals. (There is an additional fee.)

Session Comments

SESSION CONTENT QUESTIONS
  • Overall evaluation of presentation
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  • Presented as described in the abstract
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  • Organized in logical, coherent way
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  • Key points supported with breadth and depth
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  • Clearly stated significance of project/area of work that points to future use
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  • Appropriate selection of resources/handouts
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  • Allowed sufficient time for Q&A
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SESSION DELIVERY/SPEAKER QUESTIONS
  • Knowledge of topic
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  • Engaged the audience
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  • Clearly introduced and reinforced key points
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  • Effectively used slides/visuals to organize and display content
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2 evaluation forms were returned for this session.

COMMENTS:

  • I don’t know how this presentation could be better. The content and presentation was very helpful for me. Maybe in another year or two I might have some hind-sight. It was nice to have them provide the structure and the abstract. it was also very beneficial to hear about measuring the effectiveness of this process is hit-or-miss so I know what to expect.
  • The formal training part was more helpful than I anticipated. Sometimes I think i know more than I do!

Twitter Use at #STC12 Summit

For the two year anniversary of this blog, we’ll review Twitter use at the STC Summit conference. Twitter use among attendees continues to grow dramatically. Although this post only looks at tweets during the dates of the Summit (May 19-24), use of the #stc12 hashtag began months before the conference and continues today.

Methodology

Unlike previous years where I put a great deal of manual effort into compiling the tweets by pulling from my #stc10 and #stc11 RSS feed, this year I’ve relied on the suggestions and work of colleagues Kevin Cuddihy of STC and Karen Mardahl. Thanks also to Rick Sapir for his suggestion to use twdocs.com to collect the tweets.

Graphical Portrayals of #STC12 Information

Kevin Cuddihy published a Wordle of the most commonly used tweets at the conference in his Summit Blog post. Here’s the Wordle he compiled:

As Kevin has noted, you can see that a good amount of the Wordle is composed of usernames.

Karen Mardahl (@kmdk) uses The Archivist to compile an analysis of the tweets. The two graphics and lists below are taken from her archive.

Top Twelve Twitter Handles (% Total Tweets)

  1. 10.68% by arnoldburian (Arnold Burian)
  2. 7.45% AndreaJWenger (Andrea Wenger)
  3. 6.12% dccd (David Caruso)
  4. 5.67% rjhoughton (Rachel Houghton)
  5. 5.54% seanb_us (Sean Bean)
  6. 5.19% viqui_dill (Viqui Dill)
  7. 4.39% ninjawritermama (Sarah Baca)
  8. 4.08% phylisebanner (Phylise Banner)
  9. 4.03% ricksapir (Rick Sapir)
  10. 3.99% benwoelk (Ben Woelk)
  11. 3.95% Paul_UserAid (Paul Mueller)
  12. 3.90% MKGee (MaryKay Greuneberg)

Selected Key Words (occurrences)

  1. STC12
  2. Techcomm
  3. Content
  4. Summit
  5. @AMP;
  6. Thanks
  7. STC
  8. Session
  9. Chicago
  10. STCorg
  11. Need
  12. It’s

Observations

This year saw a number of new people “leading the way” with tweets. (Some of the usual suspects were quite busy behind the scenes, contributing to their drop in tweets. Of course, it’s also possible they were doing F2F networking!)

The week previous to #STC12, I attended the EDUCAUSE Security Professionals Conference (#sec12). The tweets at #stc12 far outnumbered those at #sec12. In my experience, security professionals are reticent about using social media. That may have been a factor in the difference.

If any of you are interested in doing a more thorough analysis of Twitter use at #stc12, let me know and I’ll send you Kevin’s document containing more than 500 pages and 87K words!

Let’s hear from you!

Did you tweet during Summit? How long have you been tweeting? What do you tweet about? Do you tweet more during conferences?

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Updated: 2012 Speaking Schedule, January through June

I’ll be speaking at the following events this winter and spring. Watch for my presentation materials on SlideShare.

January 9: HEISC (Higher Education Information Security Council), Town Hall. Recording available.

January 30:  Bullet Proofing Your Career Online (with Hannah Morgan, @careersherpa), ABCPNG (Always Be Connecting Power Networking Group), First Unitarian Church, Rochester, New York

Description: What are the 10 key steps to building and securing your online reputation? A security professional and a career sherpa provide their perspectives on how to create an online presence that enhances and promotes your career safely and effectively.

April 23rd: Bullet Proofing Your Career Online (with Hannah Morgan, @careersherpa), STC Rochester Spectrum Conference, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York

April 24th: Leadership Day, STC Rochester Spectrum Conference, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, New York

Facilitating the event and the panel discussion

May 17: Engage! Creating a Meaningful Security Awareness Program (with Cherry Delaney, Purdue University), EDUCAUSE Security Professionals Conference 2012, Indianapolis, IN

 Abstract: This session will help attendees identify available resources and tools and determine the steps needed to create an engaging security awareness program. We’ll share how to integrate social media, video and other resources in an effort to reach a variety of audiences. We’ll also discuss how to leverage security incidents to create opportunities for engagement with your community. We’ll conclude the session by helping you plan a series of targeted activities for a high profile event such as the National Cyber Security Awareness Month.

May 20: Communications Liftoff! Rocketing your Community to the Stars, Leadership Day progression, STC Summit, Rosemont, IL

May 21: Bullet Proofing Your Career Online (with Hannah Morgan), STC Summit, Rosemont, IL

May 23: Shockproofing Your Use of Social Media 2012, STC Summit, Rosemont, IL

Description: Lightning Talk. What are the top ten ways to shockproof your use of social media? What’s new for 2012?
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Secure Mobile-an Oxymoron? (Redux)

Responses to the #1 topic on IdeaScale, “Consumers dictate device usage, not IT,” indicate that MANY of you believe consumers will drive smartphone adoption in Higher Education, while the sentiment around the topic, “Get rid of the walls around your enterprise data,” indicates that quite a few of you believe that core university data should be accessible to smartphone users.

However, yesterday’s polls have shown that not even all of the attendees of yesterday’s webinar use PINS or swipe patterns on their smartphones. The inherent difficulties in entering a complex password on a smartphone increase the likelihood that users will rely on simple passwords, if any, to access their devices. At the same time, users are expecting access to more and more university resources through their smartphones, increasing the risk of a data breach.

Where does security fit into this picture?

In Thursday’s webinar, “Smartphone Privacy & Security, What Should We Teach Our Users?“, the speaker, Norman Sadeh, indicated that mobile users are three times more likely to fall for phishing attempts. That statistic implies that spear phishing against university communities, which already demonstrates more success than we’re comfortable with, will be even more effective against smartphone users. As we find ourselves more and more hurried, making quick decisions just to handle the ever-increasing stream of information flowing at us, we’re more prone to fall for these attacks.

I would guess that many of us who own smartphones are using them to access our university e-mail, if not other university resources. Most of us don’t have any control over whether someone may e-mail us private or confidential information. If our smartphones become the weakest link in protecting data, they will be targeted.

How many of us have misplaced our smartphones or left them sitting on our desk in an unsecured office? Have you left your smartphone in a taxi or on a shuttle bus?

Increased access to university data is a desirable convenience. Will we be able to get the right combination of security controls, user training, and policies in place to allow smartphone access without it leading to a security breach resulting in a notification event or embarrassment to the university? What kinds of security controls are you using to prevent this? What security apps do you recommend to your users?

Lots of troublesome questions. Where are the answers?

Ben Woelk
Co-chair, Awareness and Training Working Group
EDUCAUSE/Internet2 Higher Education Information Security Council

Policy and Awareness Analyst
Rochester Institute of Technology

ben.woelk@rit.edu
http://security.rit.edu/dsd.html
Become a fan of RIT Information Security at http://rit.facebook.com/profile.php?id=6017464645
Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/bwoelk
Follow my Infosec Communicator blog at https://benwoelk.wordpress.com

This blog entry is part of the EDUCAUSE Mobile Computing Sprint and is cross-posted at http://www.educause.edu/blog/bwoelk/SecureMobileanOxymoron/227983

Mobile Devices: Paradigm Shift or Just Another Content Delivery Mechanism?

I’m curious about whether you think the integration of mobile devices into curricula is a “game changer/paradigm shift” or whether you regard it as just another content delivery mechanism. As a technical communicator, I’ve looked at the mobile device primarily as an additional delivery vehicle; a channel that can be used to reach others. As an educator, I’m thinking of the possibilities of a course structured around mobile devices as the main education platform. As an information security practitioner, I’m wary of the privacy risks and potential cyberstalking.

Will mobile devices be a boon or a bane? Will they cause a profound change in learning? Are they just a stepping stone to the next big thing?

I’m not sure. Let’s look at a few recent game changers:

  • Personal computing has been and will continue to become ubiquitous. We have access to immense amounts of information. That has changed how we research practical information. Do any of you use printed maps? What about calling 411 for someone’s phone number?
  • The growth of E-readers may eventually sound the death knell of traditional print. Newspapers are scrambling to adapt to a digital audience as they find print circulation shrinking.
  • The transatlantic cable has been described as the Victorian Internet in the way it revolutionized communication.
  • The telephone and the elevator made modern skyscrapers possible.

What about the smartphone?

  • Access to banking is now available through smartphone apps and you either can or will be able to make payments directly from your mobile device. You can also store shopping card info and coupons.
  • Mobile devices have greatly increased the access to social networking.
  • QR codes connect mobile devices to Internet-based information

Do you agree that these are game changers? Are there mobile apps that you do consider to be game changers?

Addressing the educators in my audience, how do you see integrating mobile devices into your courses? Will you redesign your course to take advantage of their capabilities? Are they just “one more thing” to consider in your content delivery? Will you incorporate social networking with both a mobile and traditional computer interface?

I’m interested in your thoughts. I’m not an expert in this area, but I’m trying to adapt to the possibilities.

Please leave a comment so we can have a discussion! Some of you have contacted me individually. Please post here so we can learn from each other.

By the way, If we’re really lucky, maybe mobile learning will be the death of PowerPoint!

Ben Woelk
Co-chair, Awareness and Training Working Group
EDUCAUSE/Internet2 Higher Education Information Security Council

Policy and Awareness Analyst
Rochester Institute of Technology

ben.woelk@rit.edu
http://security.rit.edu/dsd.html
Become a fan of RIT Information Security at http://rit.facebook.com/profile.php?id=6017464645
Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/bwoelk
Follow my Infosec Communicator blog at https://benwoelk.wordpress.com

This blog entry is cross-posted at http://www.educause.edu/blog/bwoelk/MobileDevicesParadigmShiftorJu/227783

Apps for Integrating Mobile Devices into Classroom Use and Campus Communications

How many of you are integrating mobile devices into classroom work? In addition to my role as Policy and Awareness Analyst, I teach a couple of classes, Cyber Self Defense and Effective Technical Communication.

We discuss secure use of mobile devices in the Cyber Self Defense class. We’ve also talked about potential attacks on mobile device users, especially as the devices are used more for bank account access and making payments. We discuss the potential pitfalls of location services. (As an infosec guy, I’m always focusing on the should not’s rather than the should’s.)

I haven’t really thought too much about integration into the Effective Technical Communication class.

I’m struggling with how to integrate mobile use into either classroom or distance learning. Our students can access some content from our LMS, but so far the functionality is limited. Any successful (or not successful) experiences? Any ideas?

Wearing my Policy and Awareness Analyst hat, one of our strategies in increasing security awareness is to take our message to where the students are. We created a Facebook page for RIT Information Security and have driven up the number of fans by having a drawing each fall for a $100 Barnes & Noble gift card and believe the effort has had some success. As more students use mobile devices, we’re going to want to be where they are as well. One of our HEISC Awareness and Training Working Group members suggested creating an app for security awareness. I know of a Google App for this, but I’d like to have something personalized for our institution.

Have any of you created mobile apps to integrate coursework or for other communications? Are you pushing information to the devices or are you relying on the students pulling the information? Have you found existing apps that you’ve found useful?

Lots of questions. Can anyone suggest some answers?

Ben Woelk

Co-chair, Awareness and Training Working Group
EDUCAUSE/Internet2 Higher Education Information Security Council

Policy and Awareness Analyst
Rochester Institute of Technology

ben.woelk@rit.edu

http://security.rit.edu/dsd.html

Become a fan of RIT Information Security at http://rit.facebook.com/profile.php?id=6017464645

Follow me on Twitter: http://twitter.com/bwoelk

Follow my Infosec Communicator blog at https://benwoelk.wordpress.com

Please note that this blog entry is also posted as part of the EDUCAUSE Mobile Sprint #EDUSprint at http://ow.ly/4GFzf